brow

[OE] In Old English, brow meant ‘eyelash’, but there seems little doubt, from related words in other languages (such as Sanskrit bhrūs and Greek ophrus), that the original underlying sense of the word is ‘eyebrow’, and this resurfaced, or was recreated, in English in the 11th century. Its ultimate source is Indo- European *bhrūs, which passed via Germanic brūs into Old English as brū.

The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins. 2013.

Synonyms:
/ / (as of a precipice), ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Brow — (brou), n. [OE. browe, bruwe, AS. br[=u]; akin to AS. br[=ae]w, bre[ a]w, eyelid, OFries. br[=e], D. braauw, Icel. br[=a], br[=u]n, OHG. pr[=a]wa, G. braue, OSlav. br[u^]v[i^], Russ. brove, Ir. brai, Ir. & Gael. abhra, Armor. abrant, Gr. ofry s,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • brow — brow; brow·beat·er; brow·den; brow·less; brow·man; brow·ster; high·brow·ism; low·brow·ism; mid·dle·brow·ism; zu·brow·ka; …   English syllables

  • brow — [brau] n [: Old English; Origin: bru] 1.) literary the part of your face above your eyes and below your hair = ↑forehead mop/wipe your brow (=dry your brow with your hand or a cloth because you are hot or nervous) your brow… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • brow — [ brau ] noun count * 1. ) LITERARY the part of your face above your eyes: FOREHEAD: mop your brow (=wipe the sweat from your forehead): He mopped his brow with his handkerchief. furrow/wrinkle/crease your brow (=look worried or as if you are… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Brow — Brow, v. t. To bound to limit; to be at, or form, the edge of. [R.] [1913 Webster] Tending my flocks hard by i the hilly crofts That brow this bottom glade. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • brow — /brow/, n. 1. Anat. the ridge over the eye. 2. the hair growing on that ridge; eyebrow. 3. the forehead: He wore his hat low over his brow. 4. a person s countenance or mien. 5. the edge of a steep place: She looked down over the brow of the hill …   Universalium

  • brow — (n.) words for eyelid, eyelash, and eyebrow changed about maddeningly in Old and Middle English (and in all the West Germanic languages). Linguists have untangled the knot into two strands: 1. O.E. bræw (Anglian *brew) eyelid, from P.Gmc. *bræwi… …   Etymology dictionary

  • brow — [brou] n. [ME broue < OE bru < IE base * bhru , eyebrow > Sans bhrū h, ON brūn] 1. the eyebrow 2. the forehead 3. the facial expression [an angry brow] 4. the projecting top edge of a steep hill or cliff …   English World dictionary

  • brow — [n] forehead countenance, eyebrow, face, frons, front, mien, temple, top; concept 418 …   New thesaurus

  • brow — ► NOUN 1) a person s forehead. 2) an eyebrow. 3) the summit of a hill or pass. DERIVATIVES browed adjective. ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • brow — noun 1 line of hair above the eye ⇨ See also ↑eyebrow ADJECTIVE ▪ dark, heavy ▪ bushy ▪ delicate VERB + BROW ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

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